Cacao Seeds Sprouting Inside the Fruit

I’ve always assumed that in order for a seed to sprout it should be taken out of its fruit and be planted on the ground, but my assumptions were wrong.

Cacao fruit being opened.
Cacao fruit being opened.

 

We visited a friend’s house here in Palawan and it turned out that they have not harvested their cacao tree for quite some time. Some of our friends said that they would help them out since we were not doing anything.

It was the usual process for harvesting cacao seeds. Open the fruit, get the seeds and gather them. But one fruit decided to be different by making it seeds sprout inside the fruit.

Cacao seeds that sprouted inside the fruit.
Cacao seeds that sprouted inside the cacao fruit.

 

Normal cacao seeds when fruit is opened.
Normal cacao seeds when fruit is opened.

 

Normal cacao seeds.
Normal cacao seeds.

 

I’m not sure though whether they got the fruit from the tree or they picked it from one of the fallen fruits. Continue reading Cacao Seeds Sprouting Inside the Fruit

Spotting the Eggplant Stem Borer

I was planting eggplants before but I stopped planting because of the many pests it has here in Palawan. The Stem Borer (Euzophera perticella) was one of my many problems with planting eggplant here in Palawan.

If you’re not an experienced farmer looking at the eggplant garden would only look like they are all okay.

Eggplants
Eggplants

But on closer inspection you would see that some of the stems of the eggplant are wilting.

Eggplant Stem Borer
Wilted Eggplant Stem Sprouts

When you see wilted stems and leaves in an eggplant, most likely you have a Stem Borer problem. Continue reading Spotting the Eggplant Stem Borer

Hydroponic Onions Trial 1

Here’s a progressive report of my Hydroponic Onions.

October 28, 2013 (Day 0)

Since I’m confident that I could grow seeds from a foam/sponge, I got my onion seeds started on small sponge cubes.

Since I noticed that the sponge cubes I made before was too large, I made smaller again. This time around 1 cm cubes.

Smaller sponge cubes
Smaller sponge cubes

Placed one seed per sponge cube.

Onion seed in a sponge
Onion seed in a sponge

Then placed them on a ice cream container, poured water and settled them in a cool dry place away from the rain. Continue reading Hydroponic Onions Trial 1

Hydroponic Sili Labuyo Trial 1

My progressive report on my Hydroponic Sili Labuyo. This is trial 1.

Updates

  • October 17, 2013
  • October 21, 2013 (Day 0)
  • November 1, 2013 (Day 11)

October 17, 2013

I brought a Sili Labuyo seedling from the farm to the house. This seedling came from the Sili Labuyo seeds we started on August 21, 2013.

Sili Labuyo seedling I brought from the farm
Sili Labuyo seedling I brought from the farm

October 21, 2013 (Day 0)

I transplanted the Sili Labuyo seedling from soil to a hydroponic setup (Kratky Method) with the filling as charcoal. Continue reading Hydroponic Sili Labuyo Trial 1

Starting Pechay Seeds on a Foam/Sponge

I’ve been watching a lot of youtube videos about hydroponics and one of the things that I notice Hydroponic Farmers have are seed starters like rockwool. What I’ve noticed about them is that they look a lot like a foam or a sponge and somehow had the idea of starting my seeds on a foam. So I did more research on growing things on foam and found out that you actually can. But there are still a lot of questions on my mind that I never read or watched on the videos. Plus what is written on the internet is really not enough, I still have to prove things on my own so I did it.

My 3 styrofoam cups where I put my pechay seedlings that grew on a foam
My 3 styrofoam cups where I put my pechay seedlings that grew on a foam

 Can you start seeds on a foam? The answer is YES! And I have done it.

How did I do it?

I went to a general merchandise shop here in Roxas, Palawan and looked for a dishwashing foam and found one. The yellow one is 5 Pesos/piece (4″ x 3″ x 2″) and the blue one is 10 Pesos/piece (8″ x 3″ x 2″).

The foams I bought from the General Merchandise Store
The foams I bought from the General Merchandise Store

Then I cut the yellow one into 1″ x 1″ x 2″ and cut a 1/4 inch deep slit on the foam so I could place my pechay (Bok Choy) seeds on them. Continue reading Starting Pechay Seeds on a Foam/Sponge

Transplanting to Hydroponics: Sili Labuyo Alive and Dead

We transplanted 2 Sili Labuyo Seedlings (Bird’s Eye Chili) on September 25, 2013 and I get to check them out yesterday (September 30, 2013). So 5 days after one of them is dead and the other is still alive.

The Alive One

The Alive Sili Labuyo after transplanting to Hydroponics
The Alive Sili Labuyo after transplanting to Hydroponics

I was very happy that at least one is alive after 5 days of transplanting. The leaves are now greener and healthier. The roots have also added in their number. It just feels great to do something succesful.

The roots have increased their numbers.
The roots have increased their numbers.

What we did when we transplanted this 5 days before was we placed it on plain water that we get from our faucet. We did not add anything to it. Continue reading Transplanting to Hydroponics: Sili Labuyo Alive and Dead

How to make Vermi Tea

Number of days to make: 3 days

Things needed

  • 200L Drum with water
  • Sack
  • 2 kg Molasses
  • 10 kg Vermicast

How to make Vermi Tea

  1. Dissolve the 2 kg molasses on the 200 L water.
  2. Put the 10 kg vermicast inside the sack. Tie to let the vermicast not mix with the water.
  3. Dip the sack with vermicast in the 200 L water with molasses. Let it stay for 3 days (72 hours).
  4. After 3 days remove the vermicast sack. Mix the water. The water inside the drum is the Vermi Tea.

Notes

  • If molasses are not readily available, you can use brown sugar.
  • Best if you put out the sack of vermicast 3 times a day.

How to make Tea Manure

Number of days to make: 3-7 days

Things needed

  • 200L Drum with water
  • Sack
  • 10kg Manure from cows, goats or kalabaw (water buffalo)

How to make Tea Manure

  1. Put the 10 kg manure inside the sack. Tie to let the manure not mix with the water.
  2. Dip the sack with manure in the 200 L water. Let it stay for 3 to 7 days.
  3. After 3-7 days remove the manure sack. Mix the water. The water inside the drum is the Tea Manure.

How to use Tea Manure

  • Mix 1L of Tea Manure to 1 Gallon of Water. You can use it by applying it by foliar or watering your plants.

Notes

  •  If molasses are not readily available, you can use brown sugar.
  • Best if you put out the sack of manure 3 times a day.

How to make a Seaweed Extract

Number of days: 2-4 weeks

Things Needed

  • 1 kg Seaweed. Either Eucheuma or Sargassum.
  • 1 kg molasses
  • Jar/Container
  • Paper
  • String

How to make Seaweed Extract

  1. Chop to tiny bits the seaweed.
  2. Put the chopped seaweed and molasses inside the jar.
  3. Cover the jar with paper and tie it with a string to secure it.
  4. Place the jar in a cool and dry place. Away from sunlight and rain. Leave it there for 2-4 weeks.
  5. After 2-4 weeks, separate the liquid from the solids. The liquid is the Seaweed Extract.

Notes

  • The ratio of the seaweed to the molasses is 1kg to 1kg, respectively.
  • If molasses are not readily available you can use brown sugar.

Makahiya, Legume that is both Friend and Foe

When I was still in elementary I had this fascination of the Makahiya. It’s usually treated as a weed as it grows almost everywhere. The remarkable trait of this weed is that when you touch its leaves during the day time it abruptly folds or closes. Thus it is called the Makahiya, or in plan simple english “The Shy One”.

Makahiya
Makahiya

Usually it’s a foe because it grows where you do not want it to grow. It also have torns that really hurts. I remember a farmer telling me that he was happy to have boots because the makahiya could no longer hurt him.

Closed Makahiya
Closed Makahiya

Contratry to popular belief, the Makahiya is actually a legume. Therefore it could get nitrogen from the air and process it to be put to a node in its root, further improving the quality of the soil. Continue reading Makahiya, Legume that is both Friend and Foe